Author: Lynn Vigo, MSW, LICSW

Mindful Monday – Saying Thanks

When I had my first child, my mom signed me up for a subscription to Reader’s Digest, telling me that it’d be a long time before I’d have time to read anything longer than what I’d find there.

She was so right about that! Twenty-two years later, she still gifts me this subscription and I’m finding lots of good mindfulness material there to share with you.

In the October 2016 edition, Lisa Fields writes The Goodness of Gratitude.  In it, she tells us that we are living increasingly in a “me-focused world” of social media where saying thanks may be a dying practice. Say it ain’t so!

Take a moment to recall how it feels when someone does something kind for you. It may be as simple as holding open a door for you as you both arrive at the same time. Now take a moment to recall the feeling you get when you express gratitude for both the small and more significant kindnesses.

So whether it’s a quick but heartfelt thanks to the stranger on the bus or a surprise thank-you post-it note left on the mirror for your loved one, set an intention today to say thanks to at least one person. Then do it again tomorrow and the next day and the next.

Mindful Monday – First Taste of the Day

 

Here’s a mindfulness exercise from Donald Altman in One Minute Mindfulness:

 

 

 

Think about the first thing you tasted this morning, perhaps a sip of coffee or minty toothpaste or cereal with milk. What, if anything, do you remember about it? If your answer is “nothing”, you’re in good company. As rushed as we are in the morning, it’s easy to go from one autopilot moment to the next without paying attention. Set an intention for tomorrow morning to pay attention to that first taste. Sip and savor instead of slurp and swig! This small step will help you as you develop a mindset of paying attention to what’s happening in the moment.

The Autism Blog turns 6!

Another year has come and gone and we have much to celebrate. First, our thanks to you, our 1000+ subscribers who let us know you find the information in our posts meaningful to your lives. 

Next, thanks to our providers and to our guest authors who take time from their busy schedules to write or film content for a blog. A special thanks to Kylie for filming Raphe and Jim for our blogcast and to Emily for her Ask Dr. Emily blog column. We’re a small but dedicated team and we look forward to another productive and successful year ahead.

 For the second year in a row Healthline has named our blog as a top Autism Blog!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mindful Monday – Color Me Calm

 

One easy way to help self-regulate when feeling overwhelmed with a flood of thoughts or feelings is have a focal point to help screen out the brain clutter. A mantra (word repeated over and over) in meditation serves this purpose. How about when you’re in the midst of your busy day and can’t take a break to sit and meditate? Try a mini-meditation!

A focal point might be a repeated word (“driving”, “breathing”) or it could be a color (such as green or blue when you feel a need for calm, yellow when you need focus) or it could be a sound (a bell or chime) to gently remind you to slow down in mind and body. Give it a try!

Parallel Paths: Our Life with Autism

Ten years ago, as a new employee in the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, I was asked by a colleague to present with her to a group of trainees.

She was to cover diagnostic evaluations and I was tasked with discussing the impact of autism on families. How on earth would I manage to accurately capture the daily challenges that often are not observed in brief clinic visits?

My hope was to help them to “get it” meaning to see just how difficult it was.Short of suggesting we hold the session in my home for a first-hand look, I decided to make a video I called, “A Day in the Life with Autism” 24 minutes representing 24 hours in our unconventional life. It was well-received and since then I have been asked to share it with many different providers and students at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington.

So much has changed in the past decade that it felt time for an update. This time though, I wanted to capture the bigger picture of our life and the lessons learned not only for providers but for parents who walk this path too.