The Autism Blog

Autism 101 Class This Thursday

Autism 101This Thursday will be the last Autism 101 class of the year. Autism 101 is a free 90-minute lecture, offered quarterly and designed to provide information and support to parents and families of children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Lecturers provide up-to-date and evidence-based information regarding the core deficits of ASD, the variability and presentation of behaviors associated with autism, prevalence and etiology, treatments available and resources for families. A portion of each lecture is dedicated to answering questions from parents and families.

Lectures are open to the general public. There is no need to register in advance to attend. Autism 101 will be held 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s main campus in room RC.3.905 near the River entrance. Parking at Seattle Children’s main campus is free in Lot 1 for those who attend the lecture in person.

Lectures are now available through Seattle Children’s video and teleconferencing outreach program and can be viewed at various locations throughout Washington and Alaska. View Seattle Children’s video teleconferencing site information (PDF).

If you have any questions please call Seattle Children’s Autism Center at 206-987-8080.

Trick or Treating at Seattle Children’s Autism Center

pumpkin2Seattle Children’s Autism Center will host a special “Trick or Treating” event on Saturday, October 25, 2013, from 10-11:30 a.m. Inside the festive and familiar halls of Seattle Children’s Autism Center, children will have the chance to practice trick or treating. This is a free event, open to all ages and siblings. There will be treats, games and prizes.

8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it. Read full post »

Reminder- Autism 200 Tonight- Preventing Family Isolation

autism 200This month’s Autism 200 Series lecture “Autism 210: You’re Not Alone – Preventing Family Isolation” will be held tonight, at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and led by Lynn Vigo, family therapist at Seattle Children’s Autism Center and parent of a teen with autism.

Parents of children with autism often report feeling alone and isolated for many reasons, including behavioral challenges and a not-always-accepting world that they must deal with. Isolation can negatively affect their emotional well-being and self-esteem. Parents need all the support they can get, yet it is difficult to ask for help and connect with others who understand. Join us tonight for a highly interactive discussion about this important topic. Read full post »

You’re Not Alone – Preventing Family Isolation – This Month’s Autism 200 Class

autism 200This month’s Autism 200 Series lecture “Autism 210: You’re Not Alone – Preventing Family Isolation” will be held Thursday, October 16, 2014, at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and led by Lynn Vigo, family therapist at Seattle Children’s Autism Center and parent of a teen with autism. Parents of children with autism often report feeling alone and isolated for many reasons, including behavioral challenges and a not-always-accepting world that they must deal with. Isolation can negatively affect their emotional well-being and self-esteem. Parents need all the support they can get, yet it is difficult to ask for help and connect with others who understand. Join us for a highly interactive discussion about this important topic.

  • Did it feel as if your world got smaller after getting your child’s diagnosis?
  • Does your child’s challenging behavior prevent you from getting out more?
  • Do you wish the world was more welcoming and accepting of your child?
  • Do you feel as if you have no social life anymore?

Read full post »

Happy

ForrestA Day in the Life at the Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center

Today marks the first day of fall quarter classes at the Burnett Center and that ‘back-to-school’ buzz has been circulating throughout the center all morning.

As I walk down the hall, I greet new and returning participants – adults with autism and other developmental disabilities – here to learn something new and be amongst peers. Beloved instructors are returning and new ones are here too, eager to bring their expertise and fresh ideas to each classroom.

At the beginning of each music class, the instructor often asks each participant how they’re feeling that day.

Today, a common theme is happy. Read full post »