The Autism Blog

Describing Behavior and Autism

Words Used to Describe Behavior: Autism’s Own Language

If you live with autism, you know that it almost has its own culture, its own language. Think of the many terms we – and others – use to describe our kids and their behavior.  For example, if your child has a school-to-home communication notebook, you may find that sometimes it comes home with a report using descriptors that you feel don’t match those you use for your child. Even for children who are verbal, it’s important for parents to communicate effectively with the numerous people who interact with our kids on a daily basis. Read full post »

Thank You to Our Families

With the hustle and bustle of the holiday season already upon us, we hope we can steal just a minute of your time and tell you why we are so truly lucky and very grateful to work with the children and families we do everyday. Thank you for all that you do, from all of us at Seattle Children’s Autism Center.  Read full post »

Autism and Preparing for the Holidays

It’s the Most _____ [add your own adjective here] Time of the Year

When you think about “the holidays,” what comes to mind? Some may experience fond memories of families coming together, homes dressed in their holiday best and the magic of doing for others. For others, the holidays evoke feelings of dread and anxiety associated with the endless chores, tasks, activities, and family time that comes along with the last two months of the calendar year. Even more stressful for some, while preparing for the holiday celebrations and attempting to complete work of your own, there are children with two weeks of winter vacation to referee and keep entertained.

Given that the holidays can be stressful for parents and kids, alike, here are some tips for getting through the holidays:

Start Planning in Advance. Lists are your best friend; make lists for meals, snacks, activities, gifts, and things to do. When it comes to prioritizing activities, work as a family to create a list of activities/tasks that are most important (e.g., gift shopping, volunteering, baking, seeing a play). For holiday tasks, assign one or more family members to each task and identify a time when this will occur (e.g., “Dad and Johnny will put up the lights on Saturday.”). Keep this information in writing and post it on a calendar where all family members can access it. Try not to over-load the schedule with too many activities; give yourself permission to leave some days open as “re-charge days.”

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Autism and the Sibling’s Perspective Day 5

This week we are featuring the perspectives of siblings that have a brother or sister with autism. Below is our last interview in this series.

theautismblog: Your name and age:

Tammy, 25 years old.

theautismblog: Your brother’s name and age:

Mikey (sometimes we call him Mikey Doodle- per his request!), 17 years old.

theautismblog: What kind of things do you do for fun?

Well, this list could go on and on, but for sake of not boring your readers… I love to travel. To meet new people. To try new things. To learn about peoples lives and history. EATING… cooking, baking, and eating! Reading. Hiking, yoga, biking, boating, and camping. Music: concerts, a new cd, a new band. My job is very fun. Read full post »

Autism and the Sibling’s Perspective Day 4

This week we are featuring the perspectives of siblings that have a brother or sister with autism.

theautismblog: Your name and age:

Margaux, 10 years old.

theautismblog: Your sibling’s name and age:

Audrey, 13 years old.

theautismblog: What kind of things do you do for fun?

I like to swim, play with friends, go online, write, read, and go to the park. Read full post »