Support

All Articles in the Category ‘Support’

Autism and Medical Hospitalization

The third part of our series on “things we’d all rather not think about” is medical hospitalization of a child with autism. To get an insider’s perspective, we turned to Julie Eigsti who wears two hats: health care professional and mom.

theautismblog: Please tell us a little about yourself and your family.

Julie Eigsti: My name is Julie, and I have been a Registered Nurse (RN) for 19 years. I had the privilege of spending 18 of those years working on the medical unit at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Since my son was diagnosed on the mild end of the autism spectrum, I have worked with three children on the spectrum. Before that, I am sad to say, I am not really sure. I have been married for 21 years and have two beautiful children, Elle who is eleven years old and Joel who is six years old. Read full post »

Autism and Things We Would All Rather Not Think About- Part 2

This is the second part in a series on the emergency department, hospitalization and insurance.

While parents all hope their children will never be hospitalized, under certain situations, it may be necessary. For children with autism, a hospitalization may be even scarier. Kids on the spectrum may become emotionally dysregulated when taken out of their routine. If it is necessary to hospitalize a child on the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit (IPU) at Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH), there are many things a parent should know and can do to help in the transition to the hospital. The purpose of this blog is to give some background on why a child might be admitted and what to expect during a hospital stay. Read full post »

Autism and Things We Would All Rather Not Think About

The first part in a series on the emergency department, hospitalization and insurance

Today we begin a series of blogs on topics that none of us likes to think about. The daily challenges autism brings are plenty enough to keep loved ones on their toes. Our experience with hundreds of families though, tells us that there is value in discussing circumstances that you hope will never ever happen to your child . . . just in case . . . Read full post »

Telling Your Child They Have Autism

Guest Writer: Karen Kaizuka, parent

Fear. That is the overwhelming feeling that rushes through me when I think about telling my son that he has autism. What do you say? How do you say it? Can we just not tell him?!!

Our little guy is 6. He was diagnosed with autism when he was 4. He is doing remarkably well. He is learning how to read. In fact, he is reading absolutely everything around him and is asking what words mean. We can’t drive down the road without him reading signs, “No Parking”, “Bridge Closed”. Read full post »

Dads and Autism

Do dads experience autism differently than moms?

That’s the question I set out to answer when I met with some of the dads who participate in our parent support group. I also invited those on our email group to send in their responses. The children represented varied in age from 3 to 14 and it had been anywhere from a year to more than a dozen years since our dads had gotten the diagnosis. Read full post »