Support

All Articles in the Category ‘Support’

What Happens After High School Graduation?

If you are a parent or caregiver of a school-age child with autism, you already are an expert at special education. Much of your focus has likely been on reviewing annual goals and tracking your child’s progress over the course of a school year. But at some point, it will be important and necessary to start looking at your child’s special education programming through a slightly different lens. One that looks further into the future and begins to think about and formulate the plan for your child’s transition from high school to whatever comes next. Read full post »

Spanish-speaking Families of Children with Autism: Resources and Cultural Considerations

Historically, Latino children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have been under-identified, mis-identified, or identified at a later age. This has been problematic because it means that Latino children with ASD have had more difficulty accessing the services and interventions they need. Although Latino children with ASD continue to be under-identified compared to Caucasian children, the gap in diagnosis rates is narrowing. As the number of Latino children diagnosed with autism continues to rise with better and more accurate diagnosis, it is necessary to have information and supports available in Spanish. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Autism Center Diagnostic Evaluation Process

Having your child evaluated for autism can bring much emotion and many questions. In an effort to help families who are waiting to be seen in our center, we asked our schedulers to tell us the most frequently asked questions they receive from parents when scheduling a child’s diagnostic evaluation. Here’s what they told us: Read full post »

Why Do Kids with Autism Do That?

When my kids were young, my son Justin was quite curious about the many odd mannerisms his sister with autism demonstrated.

We welcomed his questions as well as those from his curious neighborhood friends who we were determined to include in our friendly and oh-so-unconventional home. I did my parental best to offer up ideas as to why she does what she does, and thankfully they didn’t question me or ask to see the evidence behind my hypotheses.

We asked a panel of providers to give us their best answers as to why our kids do what they do. Shelley O’Donnell is an Occupational Therapist specializing in children with autism at Seattle Therapy Services. Jim Mancini is a Speech Language Pathologist and Emily Rastall is a Clinical Psychologist, both at Seattle Children’s Autism Center. Read full post »

Sensitivity in Terms We Use To Describe People with Autism

Do any of these scenarios sound familiar to you?

• Parents in a support group are introducing themselves and sharing a bit about their child with autism. One parent begins with this, “I have a high-functioning child; he isn’t retarded”, and goes on to describe the very challenging behaviors that are impeding his son’s activities of daily living at home and school.

• At a social gathering for parents of kids on the spectrum, one parent of a boy is observing a girl with autism. She says to the girl’s mom, “I heard that girls with autism are much lower-functioning than boys. Is that true?” Read full post »