Holiday

All Articles in the Category ‘Holiday’

Enchant Sensory Friendly Holiday Light Maze and Market

Enchant Sensory Friendly Holiday Light Maze and Market

Sunday, November 24th from 4-6 pm

Warmly welcoming all families who might benefit from a sensory-friendly evening at Enchant- the worlds largest holiday light maze and market!  Our friends at Enchant heard feedback this in the past this event has been over-stimulating for families with developmental disabilities and sensory sensitivities so are proud to be opening up a sensory-friendly event on Sunday, November 24th from 4-6 pm at T-Mobile Park in Seattle.

Attendance will be limited, and both sounds and lights will be reduced significantly, creating a more welcoming environment for families with special needs.  Open to kids and adults of all ages and all ability levels. 

Please spread the word to other groups and families who might want to participate in this festive, and friendly event.

Many thanks!

Tickets can be purchased here; https://enchantchristmas.com/pages/sensory-friendly-evening 

Our FAQ can be found here:https://help.enchantchristmas.com/en/

Practice Trick or Treating at the Autism Center

Trick or Treat at the Autism Center!

Seattle Children’s Autism Center holds an annual Trick or Treat practice party in the welcoming halls of the Autism Center. A (very) autism-friendly event for the entire family. Bring friends! All welcome at this relaxed fun-filled event designed for your family. 

Come enjoy door-to-door trick or treating, costumes, treats, games, prizes, and our memorable sensory room.  Dr. Travis Nelson from The Center for Pediatric Dentistry will be on hand with toothbrushes and non sugar goodie bags.  Saturday October 26th from 10 am – noon.  Seattle Children’s Autism Center  4909 25th Ave NE, Seattle 98105.  Plenty of parking in front.  Lots of volunteers to play with your goblins.  Come feel at home in the hallways of the Autism Center. 

8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it.
  2. Write a social story describing what your child will do on Halloween.  
  3. Create a visual schedule. This might include a map of where you will go.
  4. Practice trick or treating in a familiar environment. Visit friends and family, if possible, even neighbors.
  5. Keep trick or treating short and comfortable. Consider letting siblings (that might want to go longer) go trick or treating with a friend.
  6. Use role play to practice receiving and giving treats.
  7. If your child has difficulty with change, you may want to decorate your home gradually.
  8. Remember, Halloween looks different for every child on the spectrum and you know your child best. Use your intuition and if you only make it to three houses, that’s okay!

Hope to see you there!

Here are a couple links to helpful Halloween information:

Trick or Treat Social Story

2019 CAC Trick or Treat Flyer

All About Halloween – A Personalized Social Story

Hang this sign on your door or window to let visitors know that your home is autism friendly

5 Ways To Help Your Special Kid Love Halloween As Much As You Do!

Autism Speak: Happy Halloween – Making the holiday fun for everyone

Happy Holidays from The Autism Blog

Ready or not, the holidays are here. And with them, comes a wide range of emotions and experiences as expectation meets reality. If you live with autism, there is an additional layer superimposed on this already hectic time of year. To help, we offer a social story for the kids and some insights and tips for the adults. Check it out and share your tips for making the holidays less stressful and more enjoyable.

Anticipating the Holiday Blues

Holiday Resources- A Social Story

Happy Unconventional Holiday to you and yours!

Happy Holidays from The Autism Blog

Happy Thanksgiving from The Autism Blog

In the spirit of the Thanksgiving holiday, we here at Seattle Children’s Autism Center thank you for your support of our blog and our work with families living with autism.

Holidays bring both stress and joy so take a couple deep breaths and mindfully keep it as simple as possible so there is less stress and more joy.

 

Happy Holidays from The Autism Blog


Warm wishes for a happy holiday season, and our best to you all in the New Year.  

The Autism Blog