General

All Articles in the Category ‘General’

What Is It Like to Live With Autism?

Today’s blog is written by Ben Moore. Ben, age 26, recently shared his insights about life with autism at Seattle Children’s Autism 200 class in November and we couldn’t get enough of his honest, heartfelt answers. Today he shares a little more.

What is it like as an adult living with autism?

Like, how do I even answer this? Let’s see… It’s hard at times. Sometimes there’s too much loud noises. Sometimes people speak too fast – their language gets scrambled and jumbled when I hear it. When I speak, often times what I intend to say is not what comes out of my mouth. Most times it’s hard to sustain my attention for prolonged periods. I can be blunt and easily hurt others’ feelings (I try really hard not to). Read full post »

Autism 200 Series 2015 Line Up

autism 200

This month kicks off a brand new line up of Autism 200 Series lectures for 2015. This month’s lecture will be held Thursday, January 15, 2015, at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m.. These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

Join clinical psychologist, Raphael Bernier and speech pathologist, Jim Mancini, from the Seattle Children’s Autism Center for our annual “State of Autism in 2015” presentation. They will discuss: advances in research from genetics to broccoli sprouts; changes to statewide systems including DDA, updates on ABA and neurodevelopmental therapy coverage and trends affecting the statewide education; and how has autism spectrum disorder been covered in the Read full post »

Pacific Science Center’s Autism Early Open is Back

The Pacific Science Center is proud to present ‘Exploration for All: Autism Early Open‘ this Saturday, from 8-10 am, for all families affected by autism. Family and friends are invited to explore the Pacific Science Center during a special free morning visit, before the center is open to the public. It is a chance to view the exhibits without heavy crowds and with softened noise and visual stimulation levels wherever possible. 

This Saturday will be the first of many early open events at the Pacific Science Center for the autism community this year. With a generous grant from Safeco Insurance, the Pacific Science Center will be able to host an early open each month throughout the year. The grant allows the Pacific Science Center to Read full post »

Autism and Our Greatest Inspiration From 2014

Cheers to 2014!

Participants from a Cooking Level III class at the Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center

While the rest of the world buzzes with excitement today, making plans for the evening, reflecting on the days behind us and raising a glass to what the bright New Year may bring, today I have a different vision of what it is we should be ‘cheers-ing’ to. Naturally, we are all compelled by the freshness a new year brings; new horizons for being better, having a clearer focus, ridding bad habits and welcoming new opportunities. 

Last night, as I sat down to reflect on my year, the celebrations, hardships, people and things, that made it so rich and beautiful, my staff sent me a Ted Talk called, ‘How autism freed me to be myself’, featuring Read full post »

Saturdays with Arthur

Arthur, my 15-year-old son, has autism and getting out the house for community outings can be a complex, demanding, stressful and unpredictable journey for both of us.  

Last year, on a gray December Saturday, Arthur and I were flopping around the house in our pajamas. The day wore on and we were feeling restless and confined. Arthur started to pace and gallop. 

A clumsy giraffe in my small kitchen. His way of saying, “not one more minute under this roof.”    

I remember this day because months before this, we had some very rough moments in public. The kind of day when we both return home traumatized. Tantrums in parking lots, meltdowns in bowling alley, aggression in Safeway, bolting in the museum, the sound of breaking glass in the gift shop, nibbling others’ French fries in the food court and sniffing strangers in the elevator. Keeping him safe, apologizing to others when necessary, and helping Arthur to understand the rules of social navigation was overwhelming. I started to wonder if we’d never leave the house—even if it meant terminal cabin fever.   Read full post »

Upcoming Events and Activities for Individuals with Special Needs

As you plan your calendar for the next couple of months, please take a look at some of these great, local and free activities and events for families and individuals with special needs.

Singing-Snowman

The Arc of King County’s Latino Family Winter Party

Celebrate the New Year with games, music, food, friends and fun! All are welcome. This is a potluck event and you are encouraged to bring a dish to share. There is no cost to attend.

Saturday, December 6, 2014 from 10 am to 1 pm

Angle Lake Family Resource Center
4040 S 188th St.
SeaTac, WA 98188

Please contact Patricia Gonzalez at [email protected] or call 206-829-7027 for more information.

Sensitive Santa

The Outlet Collection will make its Santa area sensory friendly with lower lighting and quieter surroundings. Each family who attends will receive a free Santa photo and enjoy festive giveaways to commemorate the magical holiday Read full post »

Autism 101 Class This Thursday

Autism 101This Thursday will be the last Autism 101 class of the year. Autism 101 is a free 90-minute lecture, offered quarterly and designed to provide information and support to parents and families of children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Lecturers provide up-to-date and evidence-based information regarding the core deficits of ASD, the variability and presentation of behaviors associated with autism, prevalence and etiology, treatments available and resources for families. A portion of each lecture is dedicated to answering questions from parents and families.

Lectures are open to the general public. There is no need to register in advance to attend. Autism 101 will be held 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Seattle Children’s Hospital’s main campus in room RC.3.905 near the River entrance. Parking at Seattle Children’s main campus is free in Lot 1 for those who attend the lecture in person.

Lectures are now available through Seattle Children’s video and teleconferencing outreach program and can be viewed at various locations throughout Washington and Alaska. View Seattle Children’s video teleconferencing site information (PDF).

If you have any questions please call Seattle Children’s Autism Center at 206-987-8080.

Trick or Treating at Seattle Children’s Autism Center

pumpkin2Seattle Children’s Autism Center will host a special “Trick or Treating” event on Saturday, October 25, 2013, from 10-11:30 a.m. Inside the festive and familiar halls of Seattle Children’s Autism Center, children will have the chance to practice trick or treating. This is a free event, open to all ages and siblings. There will be treats, games and prizes.

8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it. Read full post »

Happy

ForrestA Day in the Life at the Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center

Today marks the first day of fall quarter classes at the Burnett Center and that ‘back-to-school’ buzz has been circulating throughout the center all morning.

As I walk down the hall, I greet new and returning participants – adults with autism and other developmental disabilities – here to learn something new and be amongst peers. Beloved instructors are returning and new ones are here too, eager to bring their expertise and fresh ideas to each classroom.

At the beginning of each music class, the instructor often asks each participant how they’re feeling that day.

Today, a common theme is happy. Read full post »

Autism and Teaching Parents to Fish

“If you give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. 

If you teach a man to fish, you feed him for a lifetime.”

Chinese proverb

We’ve all heard this saying before and know that it is used to stress the point that it is more valuable and longer-lasting to teach skills towards being independent rather than to provide short-term temporary support.

As parents, we know the wisdom of teaching our kids to do for themselves rather than doing for them. This applies to parents too. At Seattle Children’s Autism Center, we strive to empower parents by providing them with tools for parental self-efficacy, the confidence and competence to handle the challenges autism presents.

First I want to recognize that as a parent new to the diagnosis,

I didn’t want to fish.

I didn’t want to be given a fish.

I wanted nothing to do with fishing.  Read full post »