General

All Articles in the Category ‘General’

The Lion King Sensory-Friendly Performance

“Hakuna Matata- what a wonderful phrase. It means no worries….”.

For many families living with autism, something as simple as going to a movie, or out for dinner can present challenges, filling families full of worry about the what-ifs. Fears about tantrums, meltdowns, yelling or humming and the responses from those in the community can at times, make options for family activities feel limited. 

Read full post »

Autism 210 – Finding Common Ground: A Panel Discussion

This month’s Autism 200 series class is Autism 210 – Finding Common Ground: A panel discussion between Autistic and Parent Advocates.

Read full post »

Practice Trick or Treating at the Autism Center

Trick or Treat at the Autism Center!

Seattle Children’s Autism Center holds an annual Trick or Treat practice party in the welcoming halls of the Autism Center. A (very) autism-friendly event for the entire family. Bring friends! All welcome at this relaxed fun-filled event designed for your family. 

Come enjoy door-to-door trick or treating, costumes, treats, games, prizes, and our memorable sensory room.  Dr. Travis Nelson from  The Center for Pediatric Dentistry will be on hand with toothbrushes and non sugar goodie bags.  Saturday October 27th from 10 am – noon.  Seattle Children’s Autism Center  4909 25th Ave NE, Seattle 98105.  Plenty of parking in front.  Lots of volunteers to play with your goblins.  Come feel at home in the hallways of the Autism Center. 

8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it.
  2. Write a social story describing what your child will do on Halloween.  
  3. Create a visual schedule. This might include a map of where you will go.
  4. Practice trick or treating in a familiar environment. Visit friends and family, if possible, even neighbors.
  5. Keep trick or treating short and comfortable. Consider letting siblings (that might want to go longer) go trick or treating with a friend.
  6. Use role play to practice receiving and giving treats.
  7. If your child has difficulty with change, you may want to decorate your home gradually.
  8. Remember, Halloween looks different for every child on the spectrum and you know your child best. Use your intuition and if you only make it to three houses, that’s okay!

Hope to see you there!

Here are a couple links to helpful Halloween information:

Halloween Social Story Preparing_Children_for_Trick_or_treating

Halloween Social Story

Autism 209: Let’s Talk About AAC and Autism Spectrum Disorder

This month’s Autism 200 Series class is Autism 209: Let’s Talk About AAC and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Our instructors are Megan Pattee, MS, CCC-SLP and Jo Ristow, MS, CCC-SLP

Many children with ASD face challenges communicating. Luckily, communication is more than the words we speak. The goal Read full post »

The University of Washington Establishes a Program for Autism Inclusion

The University of Washington has established the Mentoring, Organization and Social Support for Autism Inclusion on Campus (MOSSAIC) program to support the growing number of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on campus.

MOSSAIC uses an empirically supported intervention strategy (peer mentoring) to provide organizational and social support to help UW students with ASD and related challenges reach their individual goals (e.g., navigation to campus resources, assistance with time management strategies and tools, strategies for communication with professors or partnered/group work, etc.).

Read full post »