Behavior

All Articles in the Category ‘Behavior’

Treatments Used With Individuals With Autism

Alphabet Soup: ABA. DTT. PRT. RDI. DIR.

These are just a few of the acronyms for a growing number of treatments used with individuals with autism.  If you recently received a diagnosis for your child you may have searched the internet and found a bewildering array of possibilities. Even if it has been years since your child’s diagnosis, you probably hear about new treatments and wonder if you should give them a try. Read full post »

What If The World Ends? When the Media Causes Anxiety in Your Child With Autism

Seattle Children’s recently received a tweet from the parent of a child with autism asking about strategies for support when the news makes their child anxious. This question comes up frequently in our clinic. The following general tips may be helpful. As usual, they should not be viewed as clinical advice and should not replace advice from your mental health or medical provider. Read full post »

Social Communication- Making Connections

Social communication is an essential component of daily interactions. It influences how people perceive a message and formulate an appropriate response.  However, in children with autism, this can often be a challenge. To help address these challenges, Jim Mancini, MS, CCC-SLP with Seattle Children’s Autism Center, shared common communicative deficits and strategies designed to encourage communication development at the Autism 205: Social CommunicationMaking Connections presentation. We attended the lecture and have recapped some of the key takeaways. Read full post »

Highlights from IMFAR and Current Findings from Controlled Treatment Studies in Autism

The International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) was recently held in San Diego from May 12-14 by the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR). In one of many research symposiums, recent findings from multiple randomized controlled trials of autism treatments were presented. The methodology used in randomized controlled trials requires substantial resources to develop strong study designs that have often not been used in autism research. Therefore, the research presented in this symposium was quite exciting, as it begins to address many of the current gaps in knowledge that have occurred due to the previous use of study designs that are not well controlled.  Read full post »

Communicating with Providers: Tips on Describing Behavior

I often hear my colleague, nurse Jason Russo, on the phone asking, “Can you describe what his meltdown looks like?” He spends much of his day fielding calls from parents about a child’s behavior, answering questions about new medications, and acting as a liaison between medical or mental health providers and parents. 

Think about all the words we use to describe our kids’ challenging behaviors: hyper, agitated, distracted, out-of-control. Yet, just as each child with autism is unique, so is the meaning of the terms we use. Read full post »