The Autism Blog

Autism 205: Inclusion: What’s Working and What’s Next? – A Panel Discussion

People with social, intellectual and behavioral differences are making positive changes in their own lives and in the lives of others. From education to policy to employment, the future is brighter because those with autism and other abilities are speaking out, stepping up and changing the way our society operates.  Read full post »

Science with Sara – Autism Science Foundation Brings Research to the Public

How do you keep up with all the new autism research? A quick search on PubMed using only the keywords “autism” results in 17,611 papers published in the last 5 years! The US Department of Health & Human Services Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee  publishes the summary of advances highlighting the significant progress in the field but this comes out once a year. With multiple autism specific journals each publishing ~10 articles monthly, there is an extensive amount of research available.  Even those of us whose jobs are in research are swamped by the amount of new work coming out weekly.

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SPARK For Autism – Camping Themed Research Day!

The Seattle Children’s Autism Center Research Team is Hosting a Research Camping Adventure!

We would love to have you come join the fun and participate in autism genetics research! The SPARK and PANGEA studies are exploring genetic differences related to autism. Families who attend the family fun day will be able to complete study participation for one or both studies in a single day!

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CDC Prevalence Estimates for Autism Rise to 1 in 59

Today the latest report from the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network was released. The ADDM is a surveillance network focused on following the prevalence of ASD. With the establishment of this network, we’ve been able to actually look at the prevalence rate of autism by estimating the rate from 8-year old children in 11 states across the U.S using the same approach each year. What is important about this approach is that prior to the establishment of this network, we were comparing prevalence estimates using different methodologies. We were essentially comparing apples to oranges, which made it difficult to draw conclusions about the rate of autism. With this network we’re able to compare apples to apples.

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Ask Dr. Emily – Broccoli and Therapy Dogs

Welcome to the April edition of Ask Dr. Emily!

We often receive questions that we want to share with all our readers. To help with this,  Dr. Emily Rastall, a clinical psychologist at Seattle Children’s Autism Center, will share insights in a question and answer format.

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