Autism 200

All Articles in the Category ‘Autism 200’

Autism and Police: Staying Safe Together- This Month’s Autism 200 Class

This month’s Autism 200 Series class  “Autism and Police: Staying Safe Together” will be held Thursday, May 18, 2017 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

With mounting tension across the country, creating a safe community requires collaboration. For individuals with autism spectrum disorder, learning to interact with police and first responders is critical. On the other hand, it is just as essential for police to understand autism and be prepared to respond effectively and safely to situations that arise involving individuals on the spectrum. The autism community must work together with law enforcement and the general public to ensure we are all safe together. This panel presentation of law enforcement officials, individuals with autism, families, and community members will discuss local efforts within police departments as well as strategies for individuals and families to promote safety for everyone involved. Instructor for this class will be Robin Tatsuda, MSW.

Parent Training to Address Problem Behaviors of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder- This Month’s Autism 200 Class

This month’s Autism 200 Series class  “Parent Training to Address Problem Behaviors of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder” will be held Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

As many as 50% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit behavioral problems such as tantrums, noncompliance, and aggression. These behaviors interfere with the performance of daily living skills and may also amplify caregiver stress.

“I feel like I am walking on eggshells, worrying that the next thing I do is going to set my child off”

“All those strategies that worked with my other child(ren) don’t seem to work with her.”

The challenges parents face in raising a child with ASD has sparked interest in the use of parent training in this population, as it empowers parents to be the agent of change for their child. This presentation will review the prevalence and impact of disruptive behaviors in ASD and how parent training is a promising line of treatment for these challenging behaviors and will provide specific tips and strategies to dealing with disruptive behaviors.   Instructor for this class will be Karen Bearss, Ph.D.

Making Friends on the Playground: Social Skills Support in School- This Month’s Autism 200 Class

This month’s Autism 200 Series class  “Making Friends on the Playground: Social Skills Support in School” will be held Thursday, March 16, 2017 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

Ever wonder what your child does at recess? Or with whom he/she plays? Social impairment is one of the most challenging core deficits affecting children with autism. Jill Locke Ph.D will discuss how social impairments manifest in schools, their implications with peers, and the steps educators can take to facilitate positive peer engagement. Both caregivers and educators are encouraged to attend this lecture! 

This Month’s Autism 200 Class – Autism Genetics: What Parents Should Know

This month’s Autism 200 Series class  “Autism Genetics: What Parents Should Know” will be held Thursday, February 16, 2017 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m. These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

Over the past decade, there have been major advances in our understanding of autism genetics, and genetic testing is often offered to patients and families. The tests (and sometimes the results) can be overwhelming and confusing. We will review what is known about autism genetics and what kinds of genetic tests are available to families. In addition, we will discuss the pros and cons of genetic testing and what types of results you might expect to receive. Finally, we will highlight research opportunities and exciting advances in genetic testing that are expected to become available in the near future. This class will be led by Heather Mefford, MD, and Jennifer Gerdts, PhD.

The State of Autism in 2017- This Month’s Autism 200 Class

This month’s Autism 200 Series class  “The State of Autism in 2017” will be held Thursday, January 19, 2017 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

 

These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

Considerable advances have occurred in both science and in the community, state and national levels in 2016. Seattle Children’s Autism Center’s Dr. Raphael Bernier, clinical director, and Jim Mancini, coordinator of training, education and outreach, will review the most newsworthy and influential scientific and community advances in the world of autism spectrum disorder from the past year. We will also discuss what we can expect in the changing educational and political landscape of 2017.