Author: The Autism Blog

Writers Read on Family, Home and Autism

Please join us Saturday, December 15, for a very special event, “Wild Round the Dinner Table”, benefiting Seattle Children’s Autism Guild. Local writers, musicians and readers will share on family, home and autism. Please see the message below from the event organizer Marya Sea Kaminski,

“Hello friends. Almost thirty years ago, my youngest brother Adam Kaminski was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. From that time until his passing in 2002, my family embraced Adam’s struggles and delighted in his humor, kindness and courage. I continue to realize the profound impact he has had on my life and, this December, I am organizing an event to honor Adam and other families like ours, who have had the experience of living with autism. 

On December 15th, please join me and a collection of other writers for a free, autism-friendly reading, “Wild Round the Dinner Table: Writers Read on Family, Home and Autism,” at Cornish College of the Arts. Please feel free to contact me at 206-372-6221.

This free event will take place at 2 p.m. at Cornish College of the Arts, room 102. *Seating is very limited. Please RSVP to thewildround@gmail.com to reserve a seat.

Autism from a Sibling’s Perspective

Please join us for our last Autism 200 Series Class of 2012

Just a reminder that the next Autism 200 Series class will be Thursday, November 15, 2012 at Seattle Children’s Hospital in Wright Auditorium from 7-8:30 pm. These classes are designed for parents, teachers and caregivers. The topics associated with the majority of classes are applicable to all age ranges and for a wide variety of children diagnosed with autism.

This month’s class Autism 211: Sibling Panel- Autism from a Sibling’s Perspective” will be led by Seattle Children’s Katrina Davis and will include a panel of siblings that all have a brother or sister on the spectrum. Below is a preview of what to expect at this month’s class. Read full post »

8 Tips for a Safe Halloween for Your Child With Autism

With all the spooky costumes, scary decorations, eerie noises, and sugary candy, Halloween can be a pretty overwhelming day and night for a child with autism.

Here are 8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it.
  2. Write a social narrative describing what your child will do on Halloween. Read the story several times before Halloween so your child has time to get used to the plan.
  3. Create a visual schedule. This might include a map of where you will go. Read full post »

Highs and Lows from the (Sometimes) Friendly Skies- One Mother’s Story

Autism and the Kindness and Unkindness of Strangers: Part 5 of 5

Today’s video is the final installment in a series of blogs that looks at the kind and sometimes unkind encounters that parents of children with autism sometimes face. Today we’d like to thank Suzanne D’Atri, a parent of a child with autism, for sharing her story about the kindness of a stranger who helped during her son’s meltdown on a plane.

After filming and hearing their stories, I noted themes emerging. How about you?

Did you notice how parents apologized for what they perceived as their fault for not planning more or better for every eventuality that might occur with their child? For having to quickly respond when the call was made to board the plane. For not taking the iPad away sooner when preparing for take-off. Read full post »

Finding Joy in the Little Things- One Mother’s Story

Autism and the Kindness and Unkindness of Strangers: Part 4 of 5

Today’s video is part of a series of blogs that looks at the kind and sometimes unkind encounters that parents of children with autism sometimes face. Today we’d like to thank Jennifer Di Bona, a parent of a child with autism, for sharing her story of a funny misunderstanding and how sometimes you just have to laugh.
Read full post »