Author: The Autism Blog

The Autism Blogcast – October Edition

News Flash: The September edition of The Autism Blogcast, featuring autism experts Raphael Bernier, PhD and James Mancini, MS, CCC-SLP.

 

In an effort to keep you up to date on the latest news in research and community happenings, we welcome two of our favorite providers best known as Jim and Raphe, the autism news guys.

In this edition they discuss research on fevers lessening behavioral problems in children with autism, promoting inclusion for people with disabilities and events that promote inclusion.

Watch our first installment in a new series from our team of reporters sent into the field! Lindsey Miller, ARNP starts off this special series asking the question “What does inclusion mean to you?”.

 

 

 

The Autism Blogcast – September Edition

News Flash: The September edition of The Autism Blogcast, featuring autism experts Raphael Bernier, PhD and James Mancini, MS, CCC-SLP.

In an effort to keep you up to date on the latest news in research and community happenings, we welcome two of our favorite providers best known as Jim and Raphe, the autism news guys.

These two have too much energy to be contained in written format so our plan is to capture them in 2-5 minute videos that we’ll post the first week of each month. We welcome your questions and comments. Tell us what you think of our dynamic duo!

In this edition of the blogcast, our reporters respond to questions from viewers, discuss Autism and the environment, differences in prevalence rates and take back the red ties! 

 

Solar Eclipse – A Social Story and Fun Tips

In this blog post, Research Associates Kira Hamer and Emily Fox offer some suggestions on how to prepare yourself and your child for the eclipse, as well as some fun activities to do in the Seattle area while it is happening!

On August 21st, 2017 we will have an amazing opportunity to see an almost complete solar eclipse. This is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. While we aren’t directly in the path of the eclipse (you have to go to Oregon for that), we will experience almost total darkness at 10:30 am when the moon passes in front of the sun! Many of us might find this experience and the science behind it incredibly exciting, but for some individuals, this event could be confusing, a little frightening, and disrupting to our routines.

Here is a social story to help prepare your child for the Solar Eclipse: I am going to see a solar eclipse!

Here is what the eclipse will look like in Seattle: http://bit.ly/2uC1FlT

Facts about the solar eclipse: http://bit.ly/2tm5aKK

How to Protect Your Eyes during the Eclipse

First and foremost: looking directly at the sun without special eye protection can cause serious damage, so always protect your family’s eyes with solar glasses if you want to directly observe the eclipse. According to space.com, there are four companies that meet NASA standards for solar glasses. These are Rainbow SymphonyAmerican Paper OpticsThousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17. Your local library may also offer free eclipse glasses! It is important to note that sunglasses are not a replacement for special viewing glasses. If you are unable to find special glasses, another way to view the eclipse safely is to build a pinhole camera. A pinhole camera projects sunlight through a small hole in a box onto the other side of the box, so that you aren’t looking directly at the sun. You can find instructions for building a pinhole camera here.

How to Prepare Your Child for the Eclipse

Like any new experience or change for a child, it can be helpful to practice what you might do the day of the eclipse or to talk about what might happen. Here are some tips to help you and your child prepare:

  • Introduce your child to the solar eclipse using a social story. You can find an example attached. It may be helpful to read the social story several times a few days in advance of the eclipse.
  • Use a stopwatch or a timer to help your child know how much time is left in the eclipse. In most locations, the total eclipse will likely last 2-3 minutes.
  • If you are using solar glasses, help your child practice wearing these glasses so that they can get used to how they feel on their face.
  • Make sure you and your child are wearing sunscreen if you will be outside!
  • If you are worried that being outside during the eclipse will be frightening for your child, watch the eclipse in a different way! NASA will be live-streaming the event, and your child may be more comfortable watching the eclipse inside at home.
  • During the eclipse, the temperature will drop significantly and rapidly. If your family will be outside, plan on bringing an extra coat or a blanket.
  • The sudden darkness during the day will likely create increased traffic. It may be helpful to either plan on staying home for the duration of the eclipse or to get to your viewing spot early. If your child has to attend camp or a school program on the day of the eclipse, you may need to warn them that the drive could be longer or you might have to drive on a different route.
  • Make the experience fun! Color pictures of the sun and the moon, get a book from the library about space and the planets or take photos of your family on the day of the eclipse. Help your child understand that this is a special and exciting day in science.

Fun Eclipse Activities

Several local libraries and community centers are hosting viewing parties with eclipse activities for families (e.g., Seattle Public Library High Point Branch, South Park Community Center, Bryant Neighborhood Playground).

  • Some libraries will also show a live-stream of the eclipse from NASA.
  • The Pacific Science Center will open at 8:30 am on the day of the eclipse, and education staff will walk guests through the science of eclipses.
  • Do-It-Yourself Time Capsules are a great way to help you remember where you were during the eclipse. You can include letters to yourself, photos, drawings, and more.

The eclipse is a great opportunity to help your kids become real scientists! NASA is asking people in the viewing area to report on what they see and experience. The GLOBE (Global Learning Observations to Benefit the Environment) Observer Eclipse App can be downloaded on your phone and guides you through how to make observations. NASA is hoping to have a million eclipse viewers contribute their findings!

The Autism Blogcast – August Edition

News Flash: The August edition of The Autism Blogcast, featuring autism experts Raphael Bernier, PhD and James Mancini, MS, CCC-SLP.

In an effort to keep you up to date on the latest news in research and community happenings, we welcome two of our favorite providers best known as Jim and Raphe, the autism news guys.

These two have too much energy to be contained in written format so our plan is to capture them in 2-5 minute videos that we’ll post the first week of each month. We welcome your questions and comments. Tell us what you think of our dynamic duo!

In this edition of the blogcast, our reporters discuss pros and cons of the McCleary Decision on public education funding, as well as Adults with ASD using state services and employment statistics.

Autism 200 Announcement – Now Available At Home

Autism 200 now available to be viewed at home!

We are pleased to announce that Autism 200, our monthly lecture series that provides information related to autism spectrum disorder is now available to be viewed at home through a PC or mobile device.  You can sign up for the live stream and view the current class schedule through the Autism 200 website.

After you fill out the form you will receive instructions regarding how to set up streaming using Blue Jeans technology from your personal computer or device.

This summer we will again be offering lectures on the transition to adulthood and will focus on vocational opportunities including classes on “Finding a Job” and “Keeping a Job”.  Of note is our September lecture on screening for ASD with a focus on educating community providers.

As always, lectures can be viewed after they are posted on our website and YouTube page.  See below to access these channels.

Thank you for watching!