Archive for 2014

Trick or Treating at Seattle Children’s Autism Center

pumpkin2Seattle Children’s Autism Center will host a special “Trick or Treating” event on Saturday, October 25, 2013, from 10-11:30 a.m. Inside the festive and familiar halls of Seattle Children’s Autism Center, children will have the chance to practice trick or treating. This is a free event, open to all ages and siblings. There will be treats, games and prizes.

8 tips for a safe and enjoyable Halloween for your child with autism:

  1. Let your child practice wearing their costume at home. This gives you time to make any last minute modifications and time for your child to get used to it. Read full post »

Happy

ForrestA Day in the Life at the Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center

Today marks the first day of fall quarter classes at the Burnett Center and that ‘back-to-school’ buzz has been circulating throughout the center all morning.

As I walk down the hall, I greet new and returning participants – adults with autism and other developmental disabilities – here to learn something new and be amongst peers. Beloved instructors are returning and new ones are here too, eager to bring their expertise and fresh ideas to each classroom.

At the beginning of each music class, the instructor often asks each participant how they’re feeling that day.

Today, a common theme is happy. Read full post »

Autism and IQ

Cognitive testingAn interview with Kelly Herzberg, MEd, CSP (Kelly has a Masters Degree in Education and a Certified Specialization in Psychometry.)

We get many questions from parents about the various clinical tools used in the evaluation of autism spectrum disorder. In today’s blog, Seattle Children’s Autism Center psychometrist, Kelly Herzberg, gives us some answers. 

1. What is IQ? How is it defined?

IQ is the abbreviation for Intelligence Quotient. Intelligence Quotient is a score that is obtained from one of several standardized tests that have been created to evaluate human intelligence. These standardized tests are administered and scored in a consistent (standard) way by a specially trained provider. The tests help us learn what information a Read full post »

AAC and Autism

AACCommunication deficit is a key feature of autism, and we see children who have communication strengths and challenges of all types. Some children benefit from the use of alternative/augmentative communication, known as AAC.  AAC includes any type of communication that is not speech in order to replace or supplement talking. Parents frequently and understandably have questions and concerns when a clinician starts talking about AAC for their child – it certainly is a new, different and unfamiliar way to communicate. Or is it? If you think about it, we all use AAC every day – we point, gesture, click on icons, text or email. This is all nonverbal communication! Not so unfamiliar after all. Read full post »

Oh the Places You Will Not Go

(with a child with autism)

Burke-Gilman TrailOn my way to work I sometimes walk a short stretch of the Burke-Gilman trail, an expansive 27-mile path for pedestrians and cyclists in Seattle. As I merge onto the trail, I make a concerted effort to become aware of my surroundings. I walk on the side of the track, my arms tucked in at my side. Cyclists reach top speed and I’m on alert for that familiar warning “On your left” which means don’t move to your left or you will become a human bike rack.

I think about my son with autism almost every time I walk this trail. This is one of many places my son cannot go. Arthur is 15 and has autism. Arthur is not always aware of the world around him and that split second instruction to watch your left side would be lost on him. He would inevitably stray and wander along the path, Read full post »