Archive for 2011

They Grow Up So Fast…

By the time your child reaches the age of 14 years, it’s a good idea to begin thinking about planning for adulthood. While this may seem early, there are many things that need to be decided, discussed and initiated before your child turns 18. Transition goals should be included in the IEP. Planning for adulthood is not a linear process and can be quite complex. Read full post »

Should I Buy One?

“Should I buy an iPad?” A question I hear often from families.

Of course they are fun and sleek, but will it help your child? Before saying yes or no or maybe- let’s take a look at several considerations. Read full post »

Social Communication- Making Connections

Social communication is an essential component of daily interactions. It influences how people perceive a message and formulate an appropriate response.  However, in children with autism, this can often be a challenge. To help address these challenges, Jim Mancini, MS, CCC-SLP with Seattle Children’s Autism Center, shared common communicative deficits and strategies designed to encourage communication development at the Autism 205: Social CommunicationMaking Connections presentation. We attended the lecture and have recapped some of the key takeaways. Read full post »

Highlights from IMFAR and Current Findings from Controlled Treatment Studies in Autism

The International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) was recently held in San Diego from May 12-14 by the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR). In one of many research symposiums, recent findings from multiple randomized controlled trials of autism treatments were presented. The methodology used in randomized controlled trials requires substantial resources to develop strong study designs that have often not been used in autism research. Therefore, the research presented in this symposium was quite exciting, as it begins to address many of the current gaps in knowledge that have occurred due to the previous use of study designs that are not well controlled.  Read full post »

Insights Into Autism Prevalence from Two Recent Studies

What’s in a number? 

Why does it seem so hard to figure out how many people have autism spectrum disorders (ASDs)? Those of us who have followed the various studies over the past 20 years are amazed and sometimes quite confused by the rising prevalence rates. Is there a worsening “epidemic” of autism cases? Are our children getting sicker and sicker? Two studies recently published may provide some clues to this puzzling problem. Before reviewing these new studies, a few words are in order about the dilemmas inherent in the strategies used for counting people with autism. Read full post »