Archive for 2011

Back to School and Autism

The Sun Returns.

Wednesday.

It’s late August and there’s a buzz in the air that’s almost palpable. Parents all over town are humming with anticipation of what, for many of us is the most wonderful time of the year. That first day back to school!

In my own family, we just made it through another long summer of not-enough-to-keep-settled, a kid who craves structure and routine. We do our best but school is the sun in her universe and without it, she’s a planet wobbling off course.  Read full post »

Autism Treatments Wrap Up

We hope our series on autism treatments has been helpful in sorting through the realm of possibilities for your child.

In wrapping up, whether you are considering discrete trial training, diet modifications, or social skills training, here are some questions to ask yourself and/or a professional you trust:

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Choosing a Biomedical Therapy and Autism

Many times when families see me, they ask what therapies they should try for their child. Unfortunately, there is no absolutely prescribed therapy or set of therapies for any child on the autism spectrum. Wouldn’t it be great if an easy roadmap to therapy existed in the dizzying world of therapy for children with autism? Wouldn’t it be great if the answers for how to treat a child (or adult) with autism were as easy as using an antibiotic for strep throat? Unfortunately children with autism spectrum disorders are so varied and their symptoms and problems are so diverse that choosing a single or many therapies is daunting.  Read full post »

Biomedical Therapies in Autism

When entering the world of autism, whether as a parent or a provider, a number of questions immediately come to mind. From the parents’ perspective, questions such as “what caused my child’s autism” and “will my child be happy as an adult” are usually at or near the top of the list. From the perspective of the provider, we often fall well short of being able to provide adequate answers. It is understandable that saying “we don’t know the cause of your child’s autism” doesn’t exactly instill confidence in us as physicians or psychologists. Read full post »

DIR®/Floortime™ and Autism

 

 Supporting the Rhythms of Relationships

Relationships are an important component to a healthy life; we experience life through shared experiences. But for children with autism, forming relationships can be challenging. The Developmental, Individual Differences, Relationship-Based Model (DIR®/Floortime™), developed by Stanley Greenspan, MD and Serena Weider, PhD, is a framework used to help children with developmental differences, including autism, work through these challenges. Read full post »