Archive for May 2011

Monthly Archive

Reading Recommendations for a Successful Summer

Books are helpful tools in educating your child about the summer transition and preparing for upcoming events. We wrote about preparing for summer in the previous blog post and thought it would be helpful to provide a list of materials suitable for your child to read or be read to, in preparation for the transition. This can be helpful in setting expectations.  Read full post »

Preparing for Summer

While summer often evokes thoughts of sunshine, trips to the beach, downtime, leisure reading, and buying ice cream, the reality is that for many families the transition from school to the unstructured days of summer can be stressful. To help families prepare, Robin Talley, MEd, BCBA with the University of Washington Autism Center (UWAC), shared some tips and best practices during a lecture at Seattle Children’s Hospital on April 21, 2011, for the Autism 200 Series.

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Preschool to Kindergarten- The Transition IEP Meeting

 

If you are planning a kindergarten transition IEP (Individual Education Plan) meeting, your child has an IEP in place and has been receiving special education services through your public school district since sometime after the age of three. It’s now time to have your final IEP meeting before your child starts kindergarten. Services and placement for entering elementary school will be determined in this meeting.

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Recreation for Adults

When you think of recreation for adults living with autism, what images or programs come to mind? Maybe you think of happy adults bowling, hiking or gathered at a community center craft table. Or maybe you didn’t have an image and you believe the recreation community has not caught up with the needs of the adult population impacted by autism.

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Communicating with Providers: Tips on Describing Behavior

I often hear my colleague, nurse Jason Russo, on the phone asking, “Can you describe what his meltdown looks like?” He spends much of his day fielding calls from parents about a child’s behavior, answering questions about new medications, and acting as a liaison between medical or mental health providers and parents. 

Think about all the words we use to describe our kids’ challenging behaviors: hyper, agitated, distracted, out-of-control. Yet, just as each child with autism is unique, so is the meaning of the terms we use. Read full post »